HomeWorldReview of facts. Does the new President of...

Review of facts. Does the new President of Mexico have her body tattooed with “satanic images”?

Claudia Sheinbaum is the first female president of Mexico. After her election, several rumors began to emerge. This is one of them.

Mexico has, for the first time in its history, a woman as President. The new Mexican head of state was elected by the National Regeneration Movement (Morena) with 59.35% of the votes, at the beginning of June. Her name is Claudia Sheinbaum, 61 years old, scientist, humanist and of Jewish origin from Eastern Europe.

Catholicism is the most practiced religion in Mexico and the new President is not included in this large segment of the population. Sheinbaum was raised in the Jewish faith, as his grandparents were Jews from Lithuania and Bulgaria who fled to Mexico in the 1920s.

The rumor of tattoos with satanic symbols went viral on social networks. In several publications, the Users accused the President of exhibiting “the cult of death.”

Although, this is a photomontage. The satanic symbols are actually butterflies. And this is easy to prove.

The original photo was shared on Claudia Sheinbaum’s own Facebook page in April of this year. It would have been taken during the National Banking Convention. “I show my butterfly tattoos. “They are my two children, Mariana and Rodrigo, and me,” she reads in the caption.

Conclusion

After being elected as the first female President of Mexico, several rumors have emerged about Claudia Sheinbaum. One of them, which went viral on Facebook, shows a photo of the president showing tattoos on her shoulder, with supposed satanic symbols. It’s false. This is a manipulated image. The original photo was shared by Claudia Sheinbaum herself. Your tattoo is actually three butterflies.which symbolizes her along with her two children.

Thus, according to the Observer classification system, this content is:

MISTAKEN

In Facebook’s rating system, this content is:

FAKE: Claims about the main content are factually inaccurate. Generally, this option corresponds to “false” or “mostly false” ratings on fact-checking websites.

NOTE: This content was curated by Observador as part of a fact-checking partnership with Facebook.

IFCN Badge

Source: Observadora

- Advertisement -

Worldwide News, Local News in London, Tips & Tricks

- Advertisement -